Current Research at UCSF

Disordered Eating and Muscle-Enhancing Behaviors in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health 

Jason Nagata, MD, MSc

We are analyzing national data that has followed adolescents 11-18 years old for over 25 years. We are examining health consequences of eating disorders, disordered eating behaviors, and muscle-enhancing behaviors in adolescents and young adults. For more information about this study, please go to: https://nagatalab.ucsf.edu/

Eating Disorders and Body Image in Sexual and Gender Minorities: The PRIDE Study

Jason Nagata, MD, MSc

We are partnering with The PRIDE Study, a large national study of people who identify as a sexual and/or gender minority (SGM), including, but not limited to, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer individuals. We are studying eating disorder attitudes and behaviors as well as muscle-enhancing behaviors in The PRIDE Study. For more information about this study, please go to: https://nagatalab.ucsf.edu/

StRONG: The Study of Refeeding to Optimize iNpatient Gains 

Andrea Garber, PhD

The Study of Refeeding to Optimize iNpatient Gains is a prospective randomized controlled trial examining two different diets for nutritional rehabilitation during hospitalization, among patients 12 to 24 years old. Unlike previous studies in this area of research, participants will be followed for one year after leaving the hospital. The purpose is to study the relationship between dietary style of refeeding during hospitalization and the rate of recovery and relapse in the outpatient setting. Safety, efficacy, and cost effectiveness will all be taken into account. Patients who are hospitalized may choose to participate in this study without changing any aspect of their care plan except for participation in additional assessment procedures such as completion of psychological questionnaires, interviews, and five brief follow-up study visits over the course of a year, which may be coordinated with standard outpatient visits. 

Online Training in Family Based Therapy

Stanford University and University of California, San Francisco are conducting a study funded by the National Institutes of Mental Health to examine an enhanced form of online training in Family Based Treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

For more information about this study, please go to: http://online-training-in-family-based-therapy.launchrock.com/

Learn more about the training under investigation here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFF5fDIlACo&feature=youtu.be       

Optimizing Fidelity in Family-Based Treatment for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa

Daniel Le Grange, PhD

We are currently conducting a research study that involves coding audio-recorded sessions of family-based treatment for anorexia nervosa to examine therapists' adherence to the family-based treatment manual. This study aims to optimize the efficacy of family-based treatment.  For more information about this study, please go to: https://psychiatry.uchicago.edu/page/optimizing-fidelity-family-based-treatment-adolescent-anorexia-nervosa

The National Eating Disorder Quality Improvement Collaborative

The National Eating Disorder Quality Improvement Collaborative is a national collaborative of Adolescent Medicine sites that provide care to patients with eating disorders. The initial goal of this collaboration was to collect and pool outcome data in order to compare effectiveness of different programs in the context of available services. The belief was that this would help to explain which program-specific factors led to improved outcomes. UCSF participated in this initial work and has remained a part of this collaborative as it broadens and expands its research scope.

Study of Hospitalized Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa (SHAAN)

Andrea Garber

Weight gain during hospitalization predicts better outcomes for patients with Anorexia Nervosa.  However, weight gain is difficult to achieve and little is known about optimal diets to safely maximize nutritional recovery. The SHAAN study is a prospective examination of refeeding during hospitalization among patients 9 to 20 years old. The purpose is to study the relation between diet and weight change, so that better nutritional approaches can be developed. Patients who are hospitalized may choose to participate in this study without changing any aspect of their care plan except for participation in several additional assessment procedures such as completion of psychological questionnaires, a bone scan, and echocardiogram (ultrasound of the heart).