Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

 

Daniel Le Grange, PhD, FAED

Director and Benioff UCSF Professor in Children's Health

Daniel Le Grange, PhD, FAED, holds a Distinguished Professorship at the University of California, San Francisco, where he is a Benioff UCSF Professor in Children’s Health and Director of the Eating Disorders Program in the  Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral  Sciences and the Department of Pediatrics. Dr. Le Grange is also Emeritus Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Neuroscience at The University of Chicago. He received his doctoral education at the Institute of Psychiatry and the Maudsley Hospital, University of London, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Le Grange’s research focuses primarily on treatment development through randomized controlled trials for adolescents with eating disorders.

He has authored or co-authored more than 680 manuscripts, books, book chapters, and abstracts and his focused scholarship has been translated into more than 10 languages. He is a well-known figure on the international lecture circuit and has on numerous occasions presented his work across North America, Europe, Australasia, Asia, and Africa. In recognition of his achievements, Dr. Le Grange was elected Fellow of the Academy for Eating Disorders in 2002. He also is the recipient of several prestigious awards, perhaps most notably the 2014 Academy for Eating Disorders Leadership in Research Award. Dr. Le Grange is a Member of the Eating Disorders Research Society, Associate Editor for the European Eating Disorders Review, and past Associate Editor for the Journal of Eating Disorders as well as BMC Psychiatry. Over the past 20+ years, Dr. Le Grange has been a lead investigator on numerous randomized clinical trials funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (United States), the National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia), as well as private foundations and other funding organizations in the United States, Australia, and Europe.

 

Erin C Accurso, PhD

Clinical Director and Associate Professor

Dr. Erin Accurso (she/her/ella) is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Clinical Director of the UCSF Eating Disorders Program. Dr. Accurso obtained her B.A. in psychology from Dartmouth College and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the San Diego State University / University of California, San Diego Joint Doctoral Program, after which she completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Chicago specializing in eating disorders treatment and research. In addition to providing outpatient care at UCSF, Dr. Accurso also consults with mental health providers in the community who are advancing their skills in treating eating disorders. She is interested in mental health service delivery and improving access to effective care, particularly improving the accessibility of evidence-based treatments for underserved minority populations. Her research primarily focuses on the assessment and treatment of youth with eating disorders, as well effective dissemination and implementation of evidence-based practices in community-based settings. To date, she has authored and co-authored over 80 publications, advancing knowledge in the treatment of eating disorders and mental health service delivery.

 

Lindsey Bruett, PhD

Associate Clinical Professor and Program Lead, Eating Disorders Program at ZSFG

Dr. Lindsey Bruett (she/her/hers) received her B.A. in psychology from Bowdoin College and PhD in clinical psychology from Temple University. She completed her predoctoral internship and postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University. In addition to providing outpatient care at UCSF, Dr. Bruett leads clinical care and training within the Eating Disorders Program at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center. She also provides brief outpatient consultation for Adolescent Medicine patients and families in the medical setting. Dr. Bruett consults to pediatricians, school staff, and families on eating disorders and general child mental health through the UCSF Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Portal Program and is an Associate Program Director for the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Program. Her research involves improving care for youth eating disorders, and she is currently working with several team members on a clinical trial investigating the impact of psilocybin-assisted therapy for young adults with anorexia nervosa. 

 

Drury, Catherine, LCSW — Pelham Together

Catherine Drury, MSSW

Clinical Psychology Training Program Predoctoral Intern

Catherine Drury (she/her/hers) is a Ph.D. candidate in Clinical Psychology at Fairleigh Dickinson University in Teaneck, New Jersey. Her clinical and research interests center around improving eating disorder assessment and treatment for at-risk and underserved populations. Prior to pursuing doctoral training, Catherine worked for eight years as a licensed clinical social worker (LCSW) in clinic, hospital, and agency settings throughout New York City serving primarily adolescents and young adults with histories of trauma. She also delivered specialized programs and services designed to meet the mental health needs of professional dancers and pre-professional dance students. Guided by her clinical experiences, Catherine’s dissertation study examined the phenomenology of body checking and body avoidance behaviors in a sample of dancers and athletes. She has an M.S. in Social Work from Columbia University and a B.A. in Psychology from Barnard College.

 

Sarah Forsberg, PsyD

Inpatient Psychology Services Director and Associate Clinical Professor

Dr. Sarah Forsberg (she/her/hers) received her B.A. from Smith College and PsyD from the PGSP-Stanford Consortium. She completed her pre-doctoral internship at the University of North Carolina, School of Medicine and postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University. In addition to providing outpatient care, she leads the mental health service in the Adolescent Medicine Unit at Benioff Children's Hospital where she provides care for individuals hospitalized for treatment of the medical consequences of eating disorders and their families. 

 

 

Sasha Gorrell, PhD

Assistant Professor

Dr. Gorrell (she/her/hers) received a B.A. in Psychology from Columbia University and an M.A. from New York University. She earned her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University at Albany in 2018, after which she joined the UCSF team as a T32 postdoctoral scholar within the NIMH-funded Clifford Attkisson Clinical Services Research Training Program. Her current research is focused on better characterizing maintenance mechanisms and shared features of anxiety and eating disorders, and risk factors for unhealthy exercise behavior. 

 

 

Lisa Hail, PhD

Assistant Clinical Professor

Dr. Lisa Hail (she/her/hers) received a B.A. in Psychology with a Minor in Dance from the University of Colorado at Boulder and a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Fairleigh Dickinson University under the mentorship of Dr. Katharine Loeb. She then completed her internship and postdoctoral fellowship in the Clinical Psychology Training Program (CPTP) at UCSF. In addition to providing outpatient care, she is an attending psychologist on the Adolescent Medicine service at Benioff Children's Hospital where she provides care for individuals hospitalized for treatment of the medical consequences of eating disorders and their families. Dr. Hail’s research focuses on improving treatment outcomes. Currently, she is collaborating on a clinical trial investigating the impact of psilocybin-assisted therapy for young adults with anorexia nervosa.

Kathryn Huryk, PhD

Assistant Clinical Professor 

Dr. Kathryn Huryk (she/her/hers) received her B.A. in Psychology & English from Barnard College and her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Fairleigh Dickinson University. She completed her predoctoral internship and postdoctoral fellowship under the mentorship of Dr. Daniel Le Grange in the Clinical Psychology Training Program at UCSF. In addition to developing and leading the EDP group programming, Dr. Huryk provides evidence-based treatment for eating disorders in our outpatient settings. Her research is focused on the development and equitable dissemination of treatments for eating disorders and body image. 

 

 

Jessica Keyser, PhD

Training Director and Associate Clinical Professor

Dr. Jessica Keyser (she/her/hers) received her B.A. in psychology from UC Berkeley and a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Temple University, with an emphasis on developmental psychopathology. Prior to joining the team at UCSF, Dr. Keyser served as the Clinical Director in the Intensive Outpatient Program for addiction treatment at the San Francisco VA Medical Center. Dr. Keyser primarily works on the outpatient team, conducting assessments and providing individual and family therapy. She is passionate about clinical supervision and training, and serves as the Training Director for the Eating Disorders Program. She is also collaborating on a clinical trial investigating the impact of psilocybin-assisted therapy for young adults with anorexia nervosa. 

 

Rachel Kramer, PhD

Assistant Professor 

Dr. Kramer (she/her/hers) received her B.A. in psychology from Montclair State University, her M.A. from American University, and her PhD in clinical psychology from the University of North Dakota. She completed her pre-doctoral clinical internship at the University of Denver, Graduate School of Professional Psychology, in the eating disorders track and she further obtained specialized postdoctoral training in eating disorders at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Her research focuses on caregiver response during FBT, protective factors against eating disorders, and weight inclusivity during eating disorder treatment. Dr. Kramer’s clinical work involves outpatient and inpatient care for adolescents and young adults with eating disorders and she runs a transdiagnostic DBT skills group for teens and caregivers at UCSF.

 

Rebecca Lazarus, BA

Multicultural Clinical Training Program Predoctoral Intern 

Rebecca Lazarus (she/her/hers) received her B.A. in Psychology from Pitzer College and is a Ph.D. candidate in Counseling Psychology at the University of Miami, under the mentorship of Dr. Daniel Santisteban. She is currently completing her predoctoral internship in adolescent mental health and eating disorders in the Multicultural Clinical Training Program (MCTP) at UCSF. Her research interests focus on developing and implementing culturally informed family-based interventions for culturally diverse families, with a focus on immigration and acculturation-related stressors. Her clinical responsibilities include providing outpatient and inpatient care for adolescents and young adults with eating disorders and conducting assessments. She is trained in family-based and cognitive behavioral treatments for eating disorders.

 

Michael Manzano, PhD

Clinical Postdoctoral Fellow

Dr. Michael Manzano (he/him/his) received his B.S. in Psychobiology from UCLA before going on to earn his Ph.D. from the SDSU/UC San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology. He completed his predoctoral internship at Children’s Hospital Stanford/Children’s Health Council. Dr. Manzano has experience delivering cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), emotion-focused therapy (EFT), family-based treatment (FBT), and parent management training (PMT) to children, adolescents, parents, and families across various levels of care (outpatient, IOP, PHP, inpatient). His research interests include the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based interventions in pediatric populations, with particular interest in health behavior change and eating disorders. He has a parallel interest in child health equity, including how increased behavioral health accessibility and implementation science approaches can be leveraged to increase equity in physical and mental health outcomes.

 

 Megan Mikhail, BS

Clinical Psychology Training Program Predoctoral Intern

Megan Mikhail (they/she) received their B.S. in biology from Stanford University and is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Clinical Science at Michigan State University. Megan’s research interests include the role of emotions and emotion regulation in eating disorders, interactions between biological and environmental risk, and eating disorders in marginalized and underserved populations. Clinically, Megan has received training in dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), family-based therapy, relational therapy, and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) along with other mindfulness-based approaches. They are an editorial board member of the International Journal of Eating Disorders and co-chair of the Academy of Eating Disorders Genes and Environment Special Interest Group.

 

Rachel Radin, PhD

Assistant Professor

Dr. Rachel Radin (she/her/hers) received a B.A. in Psychology from George Washington University and an M.A. from Teachers College, Columbia University. She earned her Ph.D. in Medical and Clinical Psychology from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in 2017, where her work focused primarily on the treatment of eating disorders, including binge eating disorder, in youth. She completed her pre-doctoral internship in pediatric clinical psychology at Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital, after which she joined UCSF as an NIH-funded postdoctoral research scholar within the Center for Health and Community and the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine. Dr. Radin enjoys integrating clinical and research interests. She specializes in the assessment and treatment of youth with eating disorders, including binge eating, utilizing CBT, DBT, and mindfulness-based practices. Her current K23-funded research focuses on developing, optimizing, and disseminating interventions to reduce dysregulated eating behavior, including stress-related eating, and improving metabolic health. 

Erin Reilly, PhD

Assistant Professor 

Dr. Reilly (she/her/hers) received her B.A. in Psychology and Spanish from the University of Notre Dame in 2012, her PhD in 2017 from SUNY Albany, and completed her APA-accredited internship and post-doctoral fellowship at the University of California, San Diego. Prior to UCSF, she was an Assistant Professor at Hofstra University in the clinical psychology PhD program. Dr. Reilly’s research focuses on trying to better understand the overlap between eating disorders and internalizing disorders to improve available treatments. She is the recipient of a K23 award from NIMH focused on testing the role of reinforcement learning in predicting response to Family-Based Treatment in anorexia nervosa. Her clinical responsibilities include providing outpatient therapy and conducting assessments; interns and fellows can participate in Dr. Reilly’s research through seeing study cases on her K23.  

 

Simar Singh, PhD

T32 Clinical Psychology Postdoctoral Fellow

Dr. Singh (she/her/hers) received her B.S. in Psychology and Integrated Biology from UC Berkeley in 2016, her Ph.D. from Drexel University in 2023, and completed her APA-accredited internship at UC San Diego. Her research interests center on identifying the biopsychosocial correlates of eating disorders, with the goal of informing biologically-driven, precision treatments. To this aim, Dr. Singh has used fMRI, standard indirect calorimetry, dural x-ray absorptiometry, and hormone assays to better understand the interface of biology and psychopathology in EDs. Clinically, Dr. Singh is trained in family-based treatment, dialectical behavior therapy, and enhanced cognitive behavioral therapy for eating disorders, and has treated adolescents and adults across various levels of care, including inpatient, partial hospital, intensive outpatient, and outpatient. 

 

Zoe Stout, MA

Multicultural Clinical Training Program Predoctoral Intern

Zoe Stout (she/her/hers) received her B.A. in psychology from The George Washington University in 2015 and her M.A. in psychology from New York University in 2017. She is a Ph.D. candidate in Clinical Psychology at Hofstra University in New York and is currently completing her APA-accredited pre-doctoral internship in adolescent mental health and eating disorders in the Multicultural Clinical Training Program (MCTP) at UCSF. Zoe’s clinical interests center around high-risk adolescent psychopathology, and she is trained in both family-based and cognitive behavioral treatments for eating disorders. Her current research interests are focused on the efficacy and feasibility of novel treatment adaptations within her clinical populations of interest, as well as trying to better understand the overlap between eating and emotional disorders to improve treatment outcomes. 

 

Jack L. Turban, MD, MHS

Assistant Professor, Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry & Affiliate Faculty, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies

Dr. Jack Turban (he/him/his) is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Affiliate Faculty at the Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies. He earned his medical degree from Yale School of Medicine and completed adult psychiatry residency at MGH / McLean (Harvard Medical School) and child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship at Stanford University School of Medicine. His research focuses on the mental health of transgender and gender diverse youth, with a focus on relevant public policies. He is a member of The American Psychiatric Association and The American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. 

 

Kimberly Yu, PhD

Clinical Postdoctoral Fellow

Dr. Kimberly Yu (she/her/hers) received her B.A. in Psychology with a Minor in English Literature from Connecticut College. Prior to her doctoral studies, Kimberly worked as a research coordinator with Dr. S. Bryn Austin in the Strategic Training Initiative for the Prevention of Eating Disorders (STRIPED) at Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Kimberly earned her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at Arizona State University under the mentorship of Dr. Marisol Perez and completed her predoctoral internship at Stanford University/Children’s Health Council. Kimberly incorporates dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and parent-based interventions in her clinical practice. Kimberly’s current research interests focus on the impacts of psychosocial stress, stigma, and intersectionality on disordered eating pathology.  

 

Naomi Lynch, BA

Eating Disorders Fellowship Program Manager and Clinical Research Coordinator

Naomi Lynch (she/her/hers) graduated from Brown University in 2023 with a B.A. in Psychology and a certificate in Data Fluency. As an undergraduate, Naomi worked as a research assistant for the Rhode Island Resilience Lab at Brown’s Warren Alpert Medical School. During her time there, she researched how the early interplay of biomarkers and social context can influence symptom development in trauma-exposed adolescents. With the UCSF Eating Disorders Program, Naomi leads the data collection of patient outcomes for the Psychiatry arm of the program and assists with the general coordination of the clinic’s research activities. She is also involved in several studies with the team, such as an NIMH-funded R21 project that aims to examine acute exercise response in adolescent and young adult females with eating disorders to better understand how it relates to eating disorder symptom severity, driven exercise, and free-living activity. In the future, Naomi hopes to pursue a Ph.D. in clinical psychology and to continue participating in research that focuses on improving mental health treatment accessibility and efficacy in underserved populations.

 

Kianna Zucker, BA

Clinical Research Coordinator

Kianna Zucker (she/her/hers) graduated from Washington University in St. Louis, MO in 2023 with a B.A. in Cognitive Neuroscience. As an undergraduate, Kianna served as a research assistant with the Center for Healthy Weight and Wellness at the Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine. She researched the effectiveness of a mobile intervention in improving clinical outcomes for patients with anorexia. With the UCSF Eating Disorders Program, Kianna will be assisting with an NIMH-funded K23-awarded project on understanding the neural correlates of reinforcement learning for individuals with the compulsive exercise subtype of anorexia, and another NIMH-funded K23-awarded project exploring how reinforcement learning predicts response to family-based treatment. She will also be assisting as a study coordinator for an R34-funded study examining the feasibility of a web-based training for private practice clinicians. Kianna hopes to pursue a Ph.D. in clinical psychology and continue her interests in eating disorder research and using novel interventions to promote equitable eating disorder treatment.